One Pot Unicorn Blood Soup | Beet Ginger Veggie Soup

“It is a terrible crime to slay a unicorn. Drinking the blood of a unicorn will keep you alive even if you are an inch from death, but at a terrible price.

You have slain something so pure that from the moment the blood touches your lips, you will have a half-life. A cursed life.”

— Firenze | Harry Potter + the Sorcerer’s Stone

I’ve always loved this quote from Harry Potter, especially the part about the karmic consequences of slaying a pure being. It certainly meshes well with my convictions about ahimsa and veganism!

Unicorn Blood Soup | plantcrush.co
Don’t worry, no unicorns were slain in the making of this soup. It’s raining hard here in Texas, so I made a quick batch of this colorful one pot soup. I decided to call it unicorn blood soup because I was feeling spooky! I know unicorn blood in the HP movies is silver, but we can just pretend it turns bright pink when cooked…haha. 🙂 Enjoy!!


One Pot Unicorn Blood Soup | Beet Ginger Veggie Soup
makes 2 servings


Time: 15-20 minutes
Ingredients:

  • 4 cups water
  • 1 tablespoon roughly chopped ginger
  • 3 – 4 oz of your favorite pasta (I used Banza’s chickpea pasta!)
  • 1 medium carrot, julienned (about 1/2 cup)
  • half a beet, julienned (about 1/2 cup)
  • 1 cup frozen edamame
  • 1.5 teaspoons mushroom powder, or to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon liquid aminos, or to taste
  • white pepper, to taste
  • toppings: chives, purple shiso leaves, cilantro, and scallions

Method:

  1. Blend 4 cups of water with the ginger until the ginger is pulverized (I used the whole juice setting on my Blendtec).
  2. Bring the ginger juice to a boil, and add the pasta. Cook according to package directions, adding all the veggies and seasonings halfway through the cooking process.
  3. Once the pasta has been cooked, bring the heat down low and add more seasoning to your taste, if needed.
  4. Enjoy!

Happy Halloween, y’all!

Ginger Shiitake Yuba Soup

I don’t know about you, but this semester is already draining the life out of me! This soup is a life saver when you’re hit with allergies, a sinus infection, body aches, food poisoning, and your period. Yes, I literally had to deal with all of that last week, on top of my thesis. I barely felt like eating, or cooking, for that matter, but I knew I needed something hot, spicy, soothing, and relatively easy (compared to the preparations and wait time for phở).

This healing soup comes together quickly, without too much work. The fiery combination of garlic, ginger, and white pepper will wake your senses, warming you from head to toe. I also like that there’s not too much chewing involved. It’s funny how the most mundane tasks, like chewing, become 100 times more difficult when you’re sick. This soup provides a spicy burst of nutrition to keep you going!Ginger Shiitake Yuba Soup | plantcrush.co

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Vegan Chinese Five Spice Beef Stir-Fry

Vegan Chinese Five Spice Beef Stir-Fry | plantcrush.coIf you haven’t noticed already, I’m kind of obsessed with Chinese five spice. I’ve used it to spice up BBQ jackfruit buns, added it to creamy peanut sauce, and I’ve even made cookies with it! Here’s a classic dish my mom always makes with this iconic spice–a fragrant faux beef stir fry that can serve as the protein base for a variety of other dishes. Continue reading

Vietnamese Inspired Mock Tuna Salad

Vietnamese Inspired Mock Tuna Salad | plantcrush.co


I’ve had this one on my mind for a while–a vegan “tuna” salad infused with Vietnamese flavors, like nước mắm! This is not traditional from my experience, and I tried to find some examples but couldn’t find that much online. However, I was particularly inspired by this account and recipe from Andrew Zimmern, influenced by his experience on a Vietnamese island. It sounded legit, so I decided to give it a try, with a plant-based twist! Can you guess what I used in place of tuna? Continue reading

Vegan Vietnamese Fish Dipping Sauce | Nước Mắm Chấm Chay

Cleaned Up Flatlays-5There’s no way around it–you can’t do Vietnamese food without nước mắm (fish sauce).
It’s the main base in nước chấm, a light dipping sauce that accompanies most Vietnamese dishes. You’d think this would be an issue for Vietnamese vegans and vegetarians, but it’s actually the easiest thing, especially for those of us who grew up around the spiritual traditions of vegetarianism.  Continue reading

Five Spice Peanut Sauce

VeganMoFo-Banner

Guys, I’m participating in VeganMoFo again! VeganMoFo is a month-long challenge to post as much vegan food as possible, kind of like NaNoWriMo. It’s been a few years since I took part, but I decided (to be crazy) and challenge myself this month. It’s the most insane time for me to do this, because I’m in the middle of my design thesis for graduate school (more on that as the month progresses). However, I owe you guys so many blog posts and recipes that I’ve been testing over and over (I need to get over perfectionism)…and I guess I’m all about the crazy! Check out my IG post below to learn more about me and my focus. Continue reading

The Creek Cafe | Vegan Omakase

This past weekend, the sunlit and cozy interiors of The Creek Cafe welcomed a trickling but steadily increasing stream of curious diners, all eager to get a taste of the cafe’s new vegan Omakase menu. Nestled in the historic Lakewood neighborhood in Dallas, the spot describes itself as Americana with a Tokyo twist. On a normal day, they serve breakfast, pastries, French toast, and Japanese-style fluffy pancakes. Their special two-night vegan event saw such a popular demand that reservations sold out! My dear friend Christina and I were among the lucky attendees, and I’m excited to share our experience with you.

First Photo


Omakase (お任せ): a Japanese phrase meaning “respectfully leaving another to decide what is best.” In this case, the diner is entrusting the chef to make the decision about the dishes to be served. This gives the chef creative flexibility, and also provides the diner with a unique experience.


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Classic Tofu Scramble

There are some dishes that are such staples, you could make them with your eyes closed. Tofu scramble is that dish for me. I KNOW, soo basic. But soo good. Just like avocado toast, tofu scramble is a vegan breakfast classic, loved by all. I told y’all, my body is in need of the hearty basics after all the crazy indulgences at the Houston Vegandale Festival.


Classic Tofu Scramble | plantcrush.co


Tofu scramble was the first thing my mom ever taught me in the kitchen. She likes to make hers a bit on the salty side, because we would usually eat it with plain white rice. SO GOOD. It’s a staple that stands the test of time. Last year, one of my vegan friends told me that my tofu scramble back in high school actually introduced her to vegan food. High school was at least 10 years ago…I was so touched!! Omnivores have told me that this scramble even rivals the one at a certain beloved vegan diner around these parts (Spiral Diner, I still love you and your migas; don’t come for me, hahaha). My cousin Jackie is also obsessed with my tofu scramble and has always asked me exactly how I make it, so I made a Highlight about it on my Instagram to share the process; check it out here!

It’s high time I had a post on here dedicated to this beloved classic. My sister Anna and I often find ourselves making a huge batch of tofu scramble every week or so, especially when we find tofu on sale for 25 cents a box! Yes, that happened this weekend, and we bought ten boxes. My mom was so proud, but she said we should’ve gotten 20. #asianmoms

Tofu scramble is satisfying, quick, and packed with nutrients and protein. And it’s so easy to pack in veggies and customize it to your liking! You can make it so many different ways, depending on your mood. Tofu scramble is THE most versatile dish in any vegan’s repertoire. Everyone’s got their own way of making it, and here’s mine! Lately, I’ve been obsessed with lemon pepper and I put it in everything. It really brightens up a tofu scramble! Continue reading