Bakers Against Racism | Virtual Bake Sale for Black Lives Matter

“Imagine how much love you’ve felt when someone advocated for you. Imagine how protected you felt when someone put themselves in between you and any kind of bully…imagine.”

Angelia Trinidad, CEO of Passion Planner

It’s been a heavy time. While the pandemic is still raging its course, many Americans are confronting the truth of another illness that has been deeply rooted in our nation’s history–white supremacy. Racism is very much alive and well in the 21st century.

Black lives matter.

It’s been a minute since I talked to y’all! I meant to break my blog hiatus with some recipes inspired by my grandmother, who recently passed away. But there are more pressing matters, as I realize I haven’t been using all my platforms to their fullest potential to advocate for my Black friends. I’ve always considered myself a supporter of Black Lives Matter, but I have not been as active or vocal as I should be. I’m sure many of you may be feeling the same way. I must remind you (and myself) that guilt is not a useful emotion, and wallowing in it is actually self-centered and does nothing to help any cause. We must channel our emotions into actions. I’m not here to argue with anyone about politics. This is about basic humanity.

“Use your platform, but what does that really mean? It’s not an Instagram post. Your platform is using your time, your talent, and your treasure (your money) to really create change. Make sure you’re investing in the world you want.”

Brit Rettig, founder of GRIT Fitness (AKA my gym back in DFW!)

I am still figuring out the ways in which I can use my strengths to be a better ally,  including educating myself and others. I’ve decided to participate in Bakers Against Racism this week–a nation-wide virtual bake sale that aims to fundraise for organizations doing the important work to fight for justice. I am energized by this re-visitation of my college roots in vegan baketivism. For those of you who live in Austin, TX, check out my menu below, and order using this form.

IMG_9339


All proceeds will benefit the Austin Justice Coalition, to support their important work in serving and empowering people who are historically and systematically impacted by gentrification, segregation, over policing, a lack of educational and employment opportunities, and other institutional forms of racism in Austin. AJC has served as a catalyst for positive change towards economic and racial equity for Austin’s people of color by developing, organizing, and providing robust programs and events. Their main avenues of advocacy are education, policing, civic engagement, and community building.


If you follow me on Instagram, you’ll see I’ve been sharing some resources for ways to support the Black Lives Matter movement, especially for Asian Americans (more thoughts on the significance of Asian Black solidarity at a later date). It’s so key for us to show up and advocate for Black people in the communities and spaces we occupy.

I have been heartened to see my employer being proactive about starting a dialogue at work. Understanding the design profession’s complicity in upholding oppressive systems is important, and I hope we can engage in these issues and be advocates in our work.

Advocacy and allyship should be an ongoing effort, and I hope you will join me!

View this post on Instagram

It’s been heavy week. Scroll for ways to help & support. There are many ways to be a light, and it should be an ongoing practice, not a to-do list. ✨ . . To my Black friends, I feel I can never find the right words, but my heart breaks with you always, and I am with you. Yesterday, in a conversation with one of my best friends, she reminded me: you don't need to know what to say—the most important thing is that you are offering us support and a listening ear. And that's so true. Non-Black people, we must: Listen. Learn. Advocate. . . Particularly to the Asian American community—confronting + unpacking the internalized anti-black racism that runs rampant in our own communities is essential to this work. We must all do better. Educate yourself. As we close out Asian Pacific Islander Heritage Month, amidst increased xenophobia during this pandemic—do not forget to revisit our own history, understand how it relates to Black history. Understand that as Asian Americans, many of the rights we can enjoy today are due to the work of African Americans during the civil rights movement. Our struggles are not the same, but the root that both oppresses and pits us against each other is white supremacy. Our solidarity matters. #yellowperilsupportsblackpower . . Swipe through for a few things we can all do + should be doing. Note that this is not a checklist—these are a starting point; inspired by @fitwithmartha, @tiffanyma_rdn, and others. I also have a BLM highlight with more resources/Black voices to follow: @rachel.cargle & @adrianmichaelgreen's work especially resonate, & I've been a longtime fan of @sistahvegan's work. . . "Imagine how much love you've felt when someone advocated for you. Imagine how protected you felt when someone put themselves in between you and any kind of bully…imagine." @angeliatrinidad said this yesterday & it really resonated in so many ways! . . To my vegan friends—our veganism should aim to be intersectional, or it is nothing. Widening our circle of compassion includes both human and non-human beings. 🙏🏼 #blacklivesmatter

A post shared by Ann 🌼 (@plantcrush) on

If you live in Austin, TX, again, you can order some treats from me via this form–you have until Friday night (June 19th, 2020)! And if you don’t live in ATX, you can search for a Bakers Against Racism sale near you, or find other ways to support, wherever you are! Let’s keep this momentum going.

‘Speciesism: The Movie’ | Review + More

Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
Mark Twain

Speciesism: The Movie

Last week, on January 23rd, ‘Speciesism: The Movie’ made its Texas premiere at The Magnolia theater in Dallas. The documentary was written, directed and produced by Mark Devries, who was present at the screening.

Walking into the film, I expected an exposé about the way humans treat nonhuman animals, along with a philosophical discussion. I wasn’t wrong, but I also wasn’t expecting much humor. While I had heard that the movie had some humorous moments, I was surprised to find myself (and other attendees) truly laughing out loud several times. Devries himself narrates the documentary, managing to articulate and raise important questions about complex and heavy issues without boring the audience. He made us laugh, without belittling the issues. For those wondering, animal abuse footage was kept to a minimum.

Speciesism: The Movie

Devries, who was not vegan when he made the documentary, begins by asking questions. These questions beget more questions, fueling a journey of discovery that includes investigations, expert insights, and conversations with everyday citizens. The film ends up challenging an extremely under-recognized form of oppression ingrained in our society (and the implications, as such)–that is, the conventional, anthropocentric notion that animals hold no value beyond human use.

I appreciated Devries’ rational approach and inquisitive nature, which encouraged viewers to think for themselves. Also, I really would have liked to see more appearances from women and vegans of color and their perspectives on speciesism and other forms of oppression. However, as a conversation starter, ‘Speciesism: The Movie’ definitely has my recommendation. I would love to see a sequel exploring the intersectionality of the issues more in depth.

A philosophical discourse in itself, this is an approachable and stimulating film that serves as a compelling start to a worthwhile conversation we ought to be having about how we treat nonhuman animals, and what that says about us. I gave the movie a standing ovation, as did the other attendees who filled up the whole theater. Regardless of whether or not you are vegan, this is a must-see for anyone interested in animals, philosophy, the environment, human health, systems of oppression, posthumanist theory, or bio-politics.

For those who have seen the film…
If you’re interested in the film’s topics, the movie’s site has some post-viewing recommendations. Also, here are some of my personal recommendations about related topics (for watching and reading):

Please let me know your thoughts if you have read or watched any of the above, and if you have recommendations.
Also, please see the related articles below for more material relevant to these issues! There’s so much to discuss and read about, so I simply had to include more related articles. 🙂

Ego vs. Eco

PSA (for UT Arlington students):
The film’s philosophical points were reminiscent of class discussions from the animal studies literature course I took in 2012, with Dr. Stacy Alaimo at UTA (possibly my favorite literature course ever–take it if you can). Through examining and discussing the works of philosophers and thinkers like Nussbaum, Bentham, Montaigne, and Derrida, the class held regular discourses about the representation of animals in human culture and the ethical implications of our widespread mistreatment of other species. ‘Speciesism: The Movie’ would have fit the curriculum very well. Those of you who have taken Dr. Alaimo’s class, I highly recommend this documentary.

Related articles (check these out!):

Did you see Speciesism: The Movie? What did you think of it? Please share your comments below!