Bakers Against Racism | Virtual Bake Sale for Black Lives Matter

“Imagine how much love you’ve felt when someone advocated for you. Imagine how protected you felt when someone put themselves in between you and any kind of bully…imagine.”

Angelia Trinidad, CEO of Passion Planner

It’s been a heavy time. While the pandemic is still raging its course, many Americans are confronting the truth of another illness that has been deeply rooted in our nation’s history–white supremacy. Racism is very much alive and well in the 21st century.

Black lives matter.

It’s been a minute since I talked to y’all! I meant to break my blog hiatus with some recipes inspired by my grandmother, who recently passed away. But there are more pressing matters, as I realize I haven’t been using all my platforms to their fullest potential to advocate for my Black friends. I’ve always considered myself a supporter of Black Lives Matter, but I have not been as active or vocal as I should be. I’m sure many of you may be feeling the same way. I must remind you (and myself) that guilt is not a useful emotion, and wallowing in it is actually self-centered and does nothing to help any cause. We must channel our emotions into actions. I’m not here to argue with anyone about politics. This is about basic humanity.

“Use your platform, but what does that really mean? It’s not an Instagram post. Your platform is using your time, your talent, and your treasure (your money) to really create change. Make sure you’re investing in the world you want.”

Brit Rettig, founder of GRIT Fitness (AKA my gym back in DFW!)

I am still figuring out the ways in which I can use my strengths to be a better ally,  including educating myself and others. I’ve decided to participate in Bakers Against Racism this week–a nation-wide virtual bake sale that aims to fundraise for organizations doing the important work to fight for justice. I am energized by this re-visitation of my college roots in vegan baketivism. For those of you who live in Austin, TX, check out my menu below, and order using this form.

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All proceeds will benefit the Austin Justice Coalition, to support their important work in serving and empowering people who are historically and systematically impacted by gentrification, segregation, over policing, a lack of educational and employment opportunities, and other institutional forms of racism in Austin. AJC has served as a catalyst for positive change towards economic and racial equity for Austin’s people of color by developing, organizing, and providing robust programs and events. Their main avenues of advocacy are education, policing, civic engagement, and community building.


If you follow me on Instagram, you’ll see I’ve been sharing some resources for ways to support the Black Lives Matter movement, especially for Asian Americans (more thoughts on the significance of Asian Black solidarity at a later date). It’s so key for us to show up and advocate for Black people in the communities and spaces we occupy.

I have been heartened to see my employer being proactive about starting a dialogue at work. Understanding the design profession’s complicity in upholding oppressive systems is important, and I hope we can engage in these issues and be advocates in our work.

Advocacy and allyship should be an ongoing effort, and I hope you will join me!

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It’s been heavy week. Scroll for ways to help & support. There are many ways to be a light, and it should be an ongoing practice, not a to-do list. ✨ . . To my Black friends, I feel I can never find the right words, but my heart breaks with you always, and I am with you. Yesterday, in a conversation with one of my best friends, she reminded me: you don't need to know what to say—the most important thing is that you are offering us support and a listening ear. And that's so true. Non-Black people, we must: Listen. Learn. Advocate. . . Particularly to the Asian American community—confronting + unpacking the internalized anti-black racism that runs rampant in our own communities is essential to this work. We must all do better. Educate yourself. As we close out Asian Pacific Islander Heritage Month, amidst increased xenophobia during this pandemic—do not forget to revisit our own history, understand how it relates to Black history. Understand that as Asian Americans, many of the rights we can enjoy today are due to the work of African Americans during the civil rights movement. Our struggles are not the same, but the root that both oppresses and pits us against each other is white supremacy. Our solidarity matters. #yellowperilsupportsblackpower . . Swipe through for a few things we can all do + should be doing. Note that this is not a checklist—these are a starting point; inspired by @fitwithmartha, @tiffanyma_rdn, and others. I also have a BLM highlight with more resources/Black voices to follow: @rachel.cargle & @adrianmichaelgreen's work especially resonate, & I've been a longtime fan of @sistahvegan's work. . . "Imagine how much love you've felt when someone advocated for you. Imagine how protected you felt when someone put themselves in between you and any kind of bully…imagine." @angeliatrinidad said this yesterday & it really resonated in so many ways! . . To my vegan friends—our veganism should aim to be intersectional, or it is nothing. Widening our circle of compassion includes both human and non-human beings. 🙏🏼 #blacklivesmatter

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If you live in Austin, TX, again, you can order some treats from me via this form–you have until Friday night (June 19th, 2020)! And if you don’t live in ATX, you can search for a Bakers Against Racism sale near you, or find other ways to support, wherever you are! Let’s keep this momentum going.

5 Remarkable Things From Vegan Club’s World Farm Animals Day Event

Yesterday, the Vegan Club hosted a collaborative event with Animal Rights and Rescue of North Texas (ARRNT) and Mercy for Animals (MFA). In honor of World Farm Animals Day, the event featured Pay Per View video outreach, free vegan food samples, informational leafleting  and Q&A.

UT Arlington students sampled vegan goodies and watched a four minute video about factory farming at the World Farm Animals Day event.

The event left volunteers absolutely exhausted (we reached an estimated 2000 students total), but the following things made the whole event worthwhile.

  • Cooperation from (some of) UT Arlington’s staff:

Props to this guy (I didn’t catch his name) for helping us with the electricity! I appreciate him so much.

At the beginning of the event, many complications arose–almost everything that could have gone wrong did go wrong (I’ll save you from a full-on rant and leave it at that).

One of the problems we were having was getting the electrical outlets on site to work, but thankfully the Office of Facilities Management was very helpful in responding to my phone call–they sent someone over to do some re-wiring. They really made the video outreach part of the event possible, so I am extremely grateful to them.

It’s always great to see people to go above and beyond their jobs to help people.

  • Compassionate gestures:

    Dollars for the video outreach!

During our Pay Per View outreach, we paid participants a dollar to watch a four-minute video about factory farming, to raise awareness about where our food really comes from. The point of this activity is not to scare participants or traumatize them–the goal is to expose the industry and hopefully empower consumers to make different choices.

While most participants were initially attracted by the dollar offer, several people decided to donate their dollars back to us for the cause.

Business junior Eric Floyd donated his dollar back, with these comments:”Now I feel so bad for just wanting the dollar, at first. I had no idea what kind of profound event you guys were hosting. Thank you so much for doing this to open my eyes to these things.”

  • Collaboration of volunteers

The event would never have been possible without the help of ARRNT and MFA. All of the Vegan Club members had class during the event (though a couple were able to help for a few minutes). Without volunteers from these groups, we could not have pulled off the event in the least.

Barbara DeGrande of ARRNT provided food samples, vegan literature, a small tables, and a great canopy to protect our event from the sun.

Nora Kramer, from Mercy for Animals, even went to the trouble of purchasing a table for the event, because there were complications with our table requests at UTA. Halfway through the event, we also got another small table from Millie Hunt Fain (ARRNT).

While I was taking care of the Pay Per View, ARRNT volunteers handed out food samples, and Mercy for Animals leafleted.

All these people worked their hardest to make the event come together so that we could reach as many people as possible. I cannot fully express my gratitude to them.

  • Kids participating in our event! They were so curious and receptive.

    Receptive audience

One of the things I love best about these events is seeing the participants’ reactions.

Activists rarely receive negative responses from college campuses, because most students are open-minded.

Notably, several students from a junior high field trip were very interested in the Pay Per View. I was initially hesitant…I wasn’t sure what the rules were about engaging young audiences in discussions about such heavy topics.

However, the kids told me they were more than willing to learn and knew what they were getting into, so I had no qualms about letting them participate. Their responses were inspiring. Some kids had known about the issues, some didn’t, but most of them eagerly accepted the vegan starter kits and told me they were going to show their mothers the recipes in the back.

All other participants I interacted with expressed their concern for the issues and wanted to find out more about the vegan lifestyle.

  • Delicious food

Okay, let’s be honest–food is probably my favorite part of any event.

We got countless compliments about the free food samples at our event. Participants sampled whole wheat chocolate chip muffins, vanilla cupcakes with chocolate ganache, and Field Roast vegan sausage samples (Mexican Chipotle and Smoked Apple Sage–available at Kroger and Whole Foods).

Everyone asked for the recipes, and I will do my best to post them soon, so keep checking back!

Vegan Club’s next event will be a film screening–please come out and say hi! I will also be making free cupcakes for this event.